More recordings taken with pickup coils of electromagnetic fields from various devices. Some of these were taken with a recently-acquired Tascam DR-40X, and are a bit less noisy than the ones taken with the 70’s Tapco preamp used in the others, at least in terms of background noise.

The example this time comes from an LCD monitor:

The pack can be downloaded from the Samples page.

Also, don’t forget about the extended version of the first pack, available to supporters of any level from the FSA Patreon page.

Some recordings taken with pickup coils of electromagnetic fields from various devices. Due to the nature of these recordings, they are mono, and somewhat noisy. As an example, here’s a demo of the recording taken from an optical mouse:

The pack can be downloaded from the Samples page.

I have also added an expanded version to the FSA Patreon page, which includes longer versions of several sounds, plus an extra “bonus” sound. Supporters at any level will be able to download this and other exclusive content.

Way back in the days of Windows 95, there was a little program called Sound Raider that crawled your hard drive looking for .wav files, and played them at random speeds in 4 different channels. This program has long since disappeared, and wouldn’t work on modern systems anyway for various reasons, security issues among them. This is an attempt to recreate the functionality as much as possible with VCV, and includes some added features as well.

The patch uses 4 Voxglitch Wav Bank modules, each triggered from a clock divider that can be clocked from either the first LFO, a dedicated LFO, or a random source. The patch and the samples used in the demo can be downloaded from the Patches page.

VCV Rack – Sound Raider VCV

Way back in the days of Windows 95, there was a little program called Sound Raider that crawled your hard drive looking for .wav files, and played them at ra…

This is something I’ve been meaning to do since I heard about it, and finally got finished and sent. I have contributed a set of samples to the Stargate Sample Pack, which is described like so:

A properly open source, crowd sourced, free, royalty-free, attribution-free sample pack, designed for the common use-cases and a relatively small download size. Stargate DAW projects bundle the samples they use, but nearly all sample packs either do not allow redistributing samples, or have vague licensing that makes distributing samples questionable or difficult. This sample pack aims to create high quality samples, for free, that can be used by anybody for any purpose, without restriction.

My contribution includes drums, loops, some guitar noises, synthetic sound fx, and a few “found sounds.”

I mentioned the Stargate DAW in an update to the “Free Windows Studio” article, but in case you haven’t heard about it, it is described by the devs as “a DAW for everybody, regardless of socio-economic status,” and is designed to be “capable of running on all CPU architectures, past, present and future.” Though I haven’t found time to play with it much myself, I really like the idea, and I’m excited to be contributing in some small part to the project. You can read more about it (and how to contribute yourself if interested) here:

GitHub – stargateaudio/stargate-sample-pack

A properly open source, crowd sourced, free, royalty-free, attribution-free sample pack, designed for the common use-cases and a relatively small download size. Stargate DAW projects bundle the samples they use, but nearly all sample packs either do not allow redistributing samples, or have vague licensing that makes distributing samples questionable or difficult.