Been working on something here… this synth uses a non-standard sort of waveshaping/distortion to generate sounds. As with most FSA stuff, the sounds it makes can be pretty ugly. The waveshaping bit can produce aliasing, and no effort has been made to prevent that. Most of the rest of the synth will be familiar to anyone who has used subtractive synthesis: envelopes, filters, etc. The one other novel thing about this unit (to be called the “Shapeulator”) is that there is a resonator before the filter. The resonator uses tuned delays to bolster the sound, and these delays can be modulated to produce chorusing sorts of sounds and other things. Here’s a little sound demo:

Join my Patreon if you would like early access. The synth is mostly done, just needs the GUI finished and presets made. I will be putting an early version without these things up for patrons.

About 0:40 in, something glitched out in this one, but it kept sounding cool, so I went with it. Sound sources in this one are Klevgrand’s Pipa and iZotope’s Iris being driven by HoRNet’s HATEFISh Euclidean sequencer, with some additional MIDI mangling being done with some of Bidule’s built-in tools. Lots of effects and feedback as usual.

Noise Therapy: Session 006

About 0:40 in, something glitched out in this one, but it kept sounding cool, so I went with it. Sound sources in this one are Klevgrand’s Pipa and iZotope’s…

 

FourHead screenshot

FourHead was developed for the 2021 KVR Developer Challenge, which is currently in the voting stage. It isn’t really a delay or granulator, though it lives in that realm. It’s based on an audio buffer which constantly records the input in chunks. This buffer is then read by four “play heads” which play it back as looped segments.

More info can be found on the VST page or the product page at KVR, where it can also be downloaded.

You must be a member of the KVR forums to vote, but anyone can download the entries.

The initial sound source in this one is a recording I wasn’t completely happy with, so I replaced the original sound sources with that recording, keeping the same effects and routing in place. The original recording was random text generated with Deep AI’s text generator API being read by Wavosaur’s VST Speek plugin and processed in various ways.

Noise Therapy: Session 005

Refried NoiseThe initial sound source in this one is a recording I wasn’t completely happy with, so I replaced the original sound sources with that recording…

Btw, I missed a post here on the last one (Session 004), here’s a link.

Got back to messing around in SynthEdit again after several years, and here’s the first finished result. Spectral Destroyer is an audio-mangling/FSU plugin that uses spectral processing to do pitch and feedback-based effects. Audio demos and the plugin package itself can be downloaded from the Free VST page.

Spectral Destroyer screenshot

 

This plugin is released as freeware, but a donation would be much appreciated if you like it (link to upper right of this page).

This one is just Plugin Boutique’s Radio plugin being fed into “Autophage” random audio buffer recorder/players and various effects. Unfiltered Audio’s Sandman Pro and Glitchmachines‘ Fracture XY and Convex are the most important to the sound here. As usual, feedback is playing a heavy role too.

I used foobar2000 and Shpeck for the visuals here again, this time running the Winamp AVS plugin. While it can do cool visualizations, MilkDrop definitely runs better. That makes sense, as MD has been updated somewhat recently, just figured I’d mention it.

Full-size screenshot here.

Several years back, I released a VSTi called “Noisebot” under the “synthgeek” name. It was built in SynthEdit in the pre-64 bit days, so has become outdated.  SE can do 64-bit now, but Noisebot relied on some custom modules that aren’t available for the new version. I’ve been missing this one, so I decided to try to recreate it in Reaktor, with some success. There are some differences between this and the old version, but it does the same kinds of noisy things. You can find it on the Reaktor page here, or at NI’s Reaktor User Library.