XORbot is somewhat related to NANDroid, in that it uses logical operations to generate sounds, and features a similar modulation setup and synth engine.  The synth itself is finished, just working on presets and a manual.

Here’s an audio demo, starting from a preset and tweaking knobs:

Spectral Lemuring, a lo-fi spectral processing/pitch-shifting effect, has been released (Windows 64, VST3, free/donationware). You can hear an audio demo and download it at its dedicated page here.

If you remember Spectral Monkeyage, it’s kinda like that, and (as the name implies) is created as a sort of nod in the direction of that “classic” plugin from Shiny FX. It isn’t meant to be a direct remake or anything, but uses some similar concepts, and may fill a similar niche in one’s arsenal. Note that I have no affiliation with Shiny FX (the developer of Spectral Monkeyage), and this is only inspired by the namesake.

VST and VST3 are trademarks of Steinberg Media Technologies AG

Spectral Lemuring is, as the name implies, a spectral processing effect which is inspired by a discontinued freeware plugin with a similar name. The feature set isn’t exactly the same, but like the plugin that inspired it, it can process the high-magnitude and low-magnitude parts of the FFT signal separately, and can also “freeze” the signal.

Among the ways it differs from its inspiration are the separate pitch shifting for high and low-magnitude signals, and a resynthesis section (another way of “rebuilding” the FFT signal) which can be mixed with the iFFT output. The split point for the high and low-magnitude signals can also be modulated.

This plugin is mostly finished, though I will probably be adding preset management as present in other recent FSA plugs, fixing some graphical stuff, etc. Patreon supporters get access to a preview version, available from the FSA Patreon page.

NANDroid is a noisebox synth based loosely on the TrigPulser module I built for my hardware Lunetta-style modular. As such, it shares some DNA with the “Loid’s Cousin” Reaktor ensemble as well, which also features a section based on that module. This plugin takes the idea in a slightly different direction though, with stuff like LFO’s and a filter.

You can get the plugin (in VST3i format) and hear audio demos at the VST plugins page.

Thanks to KVR user Erisian for reporting this bug. There was a silly mistake in the installer which made it create the subdirectories for the presets twice, making them invisible to the plugin itself. This error has been fixed, so you can either uninstall it, download the updated installer (same link) and reinstall, or just move the presets from “C:\Users\[user name]\Documents\VST3 Presets\Kevin Breidenbach\FSA Shapeulator\Kevin Breidenbach\FSA Shapeulator” to just “C:\Users\[user name]\Documents\VST3 Presets\Kevin Breidenbach\FSA Shapeulator\”

Sorry for the inconvenience!

As previously noted, Shapeulator is a subtractive synth at its core, with a couple added bells & whistles. It is best at percussion, fx sounds, and other weirdness, and isn’t necessarily designed to sound “good” in the traditional sense, though it can do standard VA-style sounds too. This probably just won’t be your first choice for such things.

See the VST page for downloads and audio demos. Note that this one has an installer available to make it easier to get the presets where they need to be.

Been working on something here… this synth uses a non-standard sort of waveshaping/distortion to generate sounds. As with most FSA stuff, the sounds it makes can be pretty ugly. The waveshaping bit can produce aliasing, and no effort has been made to prevent that. Most of the rest of the synth will be familiar to anyone who has used subtractive synthesis: envelopes, filters, etc. The one other novel thing about this unit (to be called the “Shapeulator”) is that there is a resonator before the filter. The resonator uses tuned delays to bolster the sound, and these delays can be modulated to produce chorusing sorts of sounds and other things. Here’s a little sound demo:

Join my Patreon if you would like early access. The synth is mostly done, just needs the GUI finished and presets made. I will be putting an early version without these things up for patrons.

FourHead screenshot

FourHead was developed for the 2021 KVR Developer Challenge, which is currently in the voting stage. It isn’t really a delay or granulator, though it lives in that realm. It’s based on an audio buffer which constantly records the input in chunks. This buffer is then read by four “play heads” which play it back as looped segments.

More info can be found on the VST page or the product page at KVR, where it can also be downloaded.

You must be a member of the KVR forums to vote, but anyone can download the entries.